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Animal Books are Likely to Excite Readers into Non-Fiction

The co-existence of thousands of animals living amongst us is important and balances all that our Creator provides. Here are some informative and amazing factual accounts about many different kinds of animals and these books are good for all ages. Almost all are in a picture book format with beautiful photos or paintings.

Saving the Bagdad Zoo:  A True Story of Hope and Heroes, by Kelly Milner Halls and Major William Sumner, opens with a photo of a devastated palace in Iraq. The year is 2003 and the capital city is in shreds.  When Captain Sumner checks out the zoo, he finds hundreds of animals missing and those still remaining are dying from lack of food and water. He, along with an international team, begins to rebuild the zoo which in return builds the hopes and trust of the Baghdad people. Halls writes an interesting tribute, along with Sumner’s commentary on sidebars, as well as photos throughout. This book will inspire and enlighten all.

Here There Be Monsters: The Legendary Kraken and the Giant Squid, by H. P. Newquist, investigates this giant monster of the sea: the squid.  This beautifully illustrated and photographed book begins with having you imagine that you’re a ship’s boy. While on watch, you see a beast with huge eyes and tentacles that pull sailors into the sea. The book goes on from there and scientifically describes studies throughout time defining this giant. This is a great scientifically backed read!

Ape, by Martin Jenkins, and wonderfully illustrated by Vicky White, will likely draw you into this insightful book as you begin to understand the complexities and personalities of chimps, orangutans, bonobos and gorillas. The blend of oil and pencil etchings, along with the informative text, combine to create the richness this book portrays.

The Case of the Monkeys that Fell from the Trees and Other Mysteries in Tropical Nature, by Susan E. Quinlan, is a 162 page book full of amazing mysteries scientists quandary over because there’s no understanding as why these events occur. Monkeys seem to lose their grip from trees and fall, plants seem to mock other plants less desirable and ants swarm certain trees for no known benefit.

Seabird in the Forest: The Mystery of the Marbled Murrelet, by Joan Dunning, is about another mystery baffling scientists. These small birds leave the sea to nest high above land to build a nest in a canopy. The richness of the oil paintings are glorious throughout. Check out the beginning and end papers too.

Birds of a Feather, by Jane Yolen, and with photographs by Jason Stemple, is a book of poems that catches the essence of these winged creatures with an elegance and knowledge that kids will learn and enjoy!  Furthermore, full page photos enhance the poetry.

Can We Save the Tiger?, by Martin Jenkins, and beautifully illustrated with pencil and oil by Vicky White, isn’t just about the tiger, but also about other endangered species. But there is also good news about some animals making a comeback.

How to Clean a Hippopotamus, by the husband and wife team of Steve Jenkins and Robin Page, is a book that provides a fascinating look at combinations of unlikely duos that help each other in their habitats – such as crabs and iguanas and egrets and antelopes.

Orangutans are Ticklish: Fun Facts From an Animal Photographer, by photographer Steve Grubman, and with Jill Davis, has full page vivid animal photos along with interesting and unknown facts. I’ll bet you didn’t know that orangutans are ticklish!

At This Very Moment, by Jim Arnosky, is a poetic mix of a child’s daily life and what an animal might be doing at the same time. While a child is brushing his teeth, a polar bear might be running on ice.

101 Freaky Animals, by Melvin and Gilda Berger, is an engaging collection of facts and photos of animals that have interesting characteristics such as the Katydids who only sing at night and the tiny shrew who is very noisy.

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